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The Next and Last Big Idea from the Inventor of Lithium-Ion Batteries
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At ProTechnologies, we’re not only passionate about making the highest quality batteries available but we’re equally zealous about following the latest battery news and trends. We get especially excited when we hear about those who are making a difference and are as captivated by the possibilities of battery tech as we are.

John Bannister Goodenough is the perfect example. In fact, this man epitomizes the battery industry. At 92 years old, Goodenough is looking to make his invention, the world-changing lithium-ion battery, even better.

Back in 1980, this brilliant physicist invented the cobalt-oxide cathode, which gave birth to the lithium-ion battery that we know today. As we’ve talked about in the past, his battery is still powering all of our devices and has yet to be surpassed.

You’d think, at the age of 92, the revolutionary work he achieved would be, well, good enough. But this battery pioneer is not one to sit back and relax. He continues to work every day at the University of Texas with a team of research assistants in hopes to create the next super battery. Goodenough's goals for this"super battery" are quite high. He claims, if successful, it will make electric cars more viable and competitive and will effectively store solar and wind power. In short, it will negate the shortcomings of today’s lithium-ion batteries while matching the innovation they represent.

Without disclosing too many specifics—and while encouraging the scientific community to work simultaneously on their own super-battery versions—the 92-year-old is confident in his idea; an idea that could be the next breakthrough since the modern lithium-ion battery and would once again change the world.

One thing is certain: batteries are arguably the biggest technological game-changer, and those who work with them are some of the greatest pioneers in our modern day history.  

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